Guardianships & Conservatorships


Some people designate a guardian or a conservator, giving a trusted individual legal authority over their personal and health-related decisions. Typically, it is one person who is designated, however co-guardians and co-conservators can be appointed as well. They are often given Durable Power of Attorney and/or Medical Power of Attorney, which places them in the position of making decisions about another person's medical treatment, safety, and living arrangements.

A conservatorship is a legal relationship that gives authority to a designated conservator to make financial decisions, such as managing another person's bank accounts, investments, and additional assets, on behalf of an individual who has been deemed incompetent or incapacitated. The appointed conservator is responsible for paying bills, as well as managing debts and cash flow from the person’s estate.

If a person has already made a decision to appoint a guardian or conservator, the court may still determine what is best for the individual in need. This is where an experienced attorney can help navigate the court system and guide the appointee(s) through critical legal decisions.